84 WHAS is now 840 WHAS?

RadioInsight Community Forums Midwest Kentucky 84 WHAS is now 840 WHAS?

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This topic contains 18 replies, has 14 voices, and was last updated by  keithe4 3 years, 8 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
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    Posts
  • #122564

    microbob
    Participant

    Why the change from 84 WHAS. It sounds bad and hard to get used to hearing.

    #122568

    keithe4
    Member

    Because WHAS broadcasts on 840? And radios made in this century display it as 840? 😉

    They probably should have done this 20 years ago.

    Beer. Because no good joke ever started with "Two guys walked into a salad bar."

    #122569

    microbob
    Participant

    True but it will take awhile to get used to hearing while most listeners will still think of the station as 84WHAS. I guess 55KRC in Cincinnati will become 550 WKRC soon if this becomes a trend. Also,It shouldn’t matter with PPM whether the frequency is announced or not.

    #122587

    borderblaster
    Participant

    700 WLW. 840 WHAS. It’s indeed on 840, not “84”

    #122593

    They probably should have done this 20 years ago.

    Bullseye. Ask any 100 people along 4th Street or on the Belvedere about this and expect to hear 100 people answer “so what.” I’m sorry microbob, but the only people who care about an added “zero” are the radio geeks on sites like this.

    #122596

    Gene
    Member

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>keithe4 wrote:</div>
    They probably should have done this 20 years ago.

    Bullseye. Ask any 100 people along 4th Street or on the Belvedere about this and expect to hear 100 people answer “so what.” I’m sorry microbob, but the only people who care about an added “zero” are the radio geeks on sites like this.

    Just call me a radio geek then:)

    #122606

    semoochie
    Member

    True but it will take awhile to get used to hearing while most listeners will still think of the station as 84WHAS. I guess 55KRC in Cincinnati will become 550 WKRC soon if this becomes a trend. Also,It shouldn’t matter with PPM whether the frequency is announced or not.

    If this becomes a trend? That’s like saying hamburgers are a trend! It’s bad enough for FM stations to round up to the nearest whole number but for an AM station to do this in this day and age is absurd! We’ve had digital readouts now for about 40 years. How many people under 55 are using only the old analog readout radios? AM has enough problems without this.

    #122608

    Some stations make sense. But 84 WHAS is….84 WHAS. It’s not 842 or 848 WHAS, we don’t have those frequencies in the United States. There’s only one possible 84 and that’s 840.

    84 WHAS just sounds better than 840 WHAS.

    That’s just me I guess

    #122611

    Nathan Obral
    Participant

    True but it will take awhile to get used to hearing while most listeners will still think of the station as 84WHAS. I guess 55KRC in Cincinnati will become 550 WKRC soon if this becomes a trend. Also,It shouldn’t matter with PPM whether the frequency is announced or not.

    I’m only surprised that WHAS didn’t recieve the “speech balloon” logo template that many iFart talk stations have been adopting of late.

    Recorded in Ultra Stereo, the ultimately superior cousin to Normal Stereo!

    #123476

    firepoint525
    Member

    The trend from two-digit frequency on-air names to three-digit on-air representations indeed began at least 20 years ago. In 1993, I was working for the former WDXN in Clarksville, TN, when we were taken over by a new owner-manager who moved the station away from its long-time slogan “The Big 54” toward a more modern-sounding “540 WDXN.” When I questioned him about this, he said that “54” sounded like a CB channel. (Do any CBs go that high?) I agreed with the change, just not his faulty reasoning behind it. As a result of that change, I now have WDXN memorabilia with both “54” and “540” on it. That station is now WKFN, but so far as I know, still identifies themselves by their 3-digit frequency, although now with an FM translator, they are probably more likely to ID the FM frequency. (Call) Sign of the times!

    #123477

    firepoint525
    Member

    If this becomes a trend? That’s like saying hamburgers are a trend! It’s bad enough for FM stations to round up to the nearest whole number but for an AM station to do this in this day and age is absurd! We’ve had digital readouts now for about 40 years. How many people under 55 are using only the old analog readout radios? AM has enough problems without this.

    (Quote feature seems not to be working, so I will do it the old-fashioned way.)

    I made a similar point last year to a manager-owner who insisted on calling his station “Solid Gold 16” even though it is at 1570 on the AM dial. He has been through (I think) four format flips since then, but is back to that archaic-sounding “Solid Gold 16.” I hear that and I think, “16 what?” But at least they are emphasizing the actual digital frequency along with that obsolete slogan.

    #123479

    firepoint525
    Member

    Unrelated search, a station that we are all familiar with is still identifying by its two-digit frequency (at least according to their website), but has gone on to using its three-digit identifier on Twitter:

    Home

    #123481

    They did have a great synergy with a sponsor: “Live from the 84 Lumber Studios, 84 WHAS.”

    #123491

    microbob
    Participant

    84 Lumber tie in was great. I think they no longer sponsor the top of the hour news though. WHAS has lost much of their audience in the last few PPM’s. I doubt saying their exact frequency will fix the slump from 9 share down to a 6.

    #135880

    PirateJohnny
    Member

    Even though the number of syllables is the same I don’t think “The Big 890” would have sounded so grand as “The Big 89”.

    On the other hand, I think Nashville’s AM 650 WSM has always used 650.

    Some frequencies sound better complete. A station I listened to and later worked at was always 1340WBGN. 134 just has no ring to it at all.

    Maybe it’s just what we’re used to.

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