Federal budget and NPR stations

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This topic contains 14 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of miketheradioguy miketheradioguy 22 hours, 16 minutes ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
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  • #174019
    Profile photo of miketheradioguy
    miketheradioguy
    Participant

    When I found out that the new federal budget plans to eliminate federal funding for public broadcasting, I have been raising a lot of concerns regarding this issue. A massive amount of NPR stations would be forced to go dark, and may even end up losing their license to broadcast if this does go into effect, leaving only the major affiliates in operation. I’m sure that there are some other sources of funding that keep these stations alive such as grants from certain entities and even the listeners themselves. However, I predict that the FCC may end up playing a role by cancelling the licenses for all these stations or have the stations being sold to commercial broadcasters as a direct result.

    #174020
    Profile photo of joseph_gallant
    Joseph_Gallant
    Participant

    The percentage of funds for NPR (and PBS) member stations that comes from the Corporation For Public Broadcasting depends on how large the station is, how large it’s market it, and how many listeners/viewers contribute financially to them.

    For many big-city NPR (and PBS) stations, Federal funding probably makes up less than ten percent of the annual budget.

    For smaller-market stations, CPB funding is probably a larger piece of their budget.

    I would think there are some state-owned small-market NPR and PBS stations that get at least one-fourth of their budget from CPB, and one-third (or even more) of their budget from the state they’re located in.

    The bottom line: Loss of CPB funding would hurt, but big-city stations might be able to survive without CPB funding. Small-market stations might not.

    #174027
    Profile photo of miketheradioguy
    miketheradioguy
    Participant

    I was thinking the FCC could eventually force the small market NPR stations to cease broadcasting by either having their license canceled or sell the station to a commercial broadcaster.

    #174039
    Profile photo of John Basalla
    John Basalla
    Participant

    Most NPR stations are on frequencies that are within the federally designated non-commercial part of the FM band (88.1  – 90.9 FM).

    Therefore, they cannot be commercial operations.  Additionally, the FCC is not in the business of canceling licenses unless the operator is clearly in violation of Rules and Regulations (especially technical ones, such as continually broadcasting with more output power then licensed for).

    #174042
    Profile photo of miketheradioguy
    miketheradioguy
    Participant

    I would expect the NPR stations on commercial signals to be sold, and then possibly move the NPR programming to a non commercial signal.

    #174062
    Profile photo of OldNewsGuy
    OldNewsGuy
    Participant

    I was thinking the FCC could eventually force the small market NPR stations to cease broadcasting by either having their license canceled or sell the station to a commercial broadcaster.

    Why would the FCC do that?

    #174063
    Profile photo of miketheradioguy
    miketheradioguy
    Participant

    The president may issue an executive order that would require all NPR member stations to go dark.

    #174070
    Profile photo of John Basalla
    John Basalla
    Participant

    Here are some interesting questions.  If an NPR station happens to be in the commercial band, could that station, if it chose to, become a commercial operation that continues to run the NPR programming?

    Given that some, or much, of the public radio programming is not spot-sales friendly, could this station that happens to be on the commercial band, continue asking for donations from listeners  (while also selling air time like the other commercial broadcasters) and, therefore, continue having their pledge breaks?

    #174097
    Profile photo of OldNewsGuy
    OldNewsGuy
    Participant

    The president may issue an executive order that would require all NPR member stations to go dark.

    Again….You expect this?….based on what?

    You know that not all non-comm’s are “NPR Stations”…right?

    And Trump would require all non-profits to simply dissolve?

    #174100
    Profile photo of miketheradioguy
    miketheradioguy
    Participant

    I bet eliminating federal funding for public broadcasting could be part of a bigger plan for the FCC to eliminate the “reserved band” rule, allowing commercial broadcasters to broadcast their stations on 88.1-91.9. Even radio stations in Mexico and Canada aren’t subject to the “reserved band” rule and broadcast any format regardless of the frequency.

    #174103
    Profile photo of OldNewsGuy
    OldNewsGuy
    Participant

    I bet eliminating federal funding for public broadcasting could be part of a bigger plan for the FCC to eliminate the “reserved band” rule, allowing commercial broadcasters to broadcast their stations on 88.1-91.9.

    1.) Where in Government has an official ever suggested the need to get rid of the allocation for non-comm stations? Or are you just making this up?

    2.) Elimination of “Federal Funding” does not eliminate non-comm stations.

    3.) You seem to think the government is set on eliminating them. Has any government official or politician ever suggested such?

    4.) Do you know what percentage of the budget of WGBH comes from the governent?

    #174119
    Profile photo of miketheradioguy
    miketheradioguy
    Participant

    These are only my opinions on the possible elimination of federal funding for public broadcasting. Although I’m not saying that any of this will happen, but I think it would be nice to see the FCC to relax its rules regarding the allocation for non-commercial signals, giving the flexibility for commercial broadcasters to use the non-commercial signals to possibly rebroadcast AM stations.

    #174129
    Profile photo of John Basalla
    John Basalla
    Participant

    The president may issue an executive order that would require all NPR member stations to go dark.

    I’m taking this as a joke.
    #174130
    Profile photo of John Basalla
    John Basalla
    Participant

    Even radio stations in Mexico and Canada aren’t subject to the “reserved band” rule and broadcast any format regardless of the frequency.

    Correct, but that’s simply because those nations chose not to do what the U.S. decided to do with those frequencies.  Both are fine as we don’t control them and they don’t control us.

     

    #174143
    Profile photo of miketheradioguy
    miketheradioguy
    Participant

    I just wanted to know everyone’s opinions if the FCC eventually plans to relax its rules regarding the reserved band, and give the flexibility to commercial broadcasters to use the reserved band for some of its stations.

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