No More Rush Limbaugh on WRKO

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  • Posted In: Boston


  • Member
    #136456

    As for that “highly devoted” audience, it hasn’t followed him (so far) in Greater New York. WOR’s recent gains in the NYC suburbs are because it has the New York Mets.

    Sorry for going off topic but WOR/IHeart have actually done a pretty good job with carrying the Mets. The WOR Sports Zone is pretty enjoyable to listen, especially after Mets games.

    And once in awhile Mark Simone is enjoyable to listen to but not talking about politics 24/7 helps.


    Member
    #136464

    Rush will probably continue on-air until his health prohibits it. He lives for the soap-box and the audience attention. And his audience is still sizable and highly devoted.

    Then why is Entercom dropping Limbaugh in Boston? The company has a sizable contract with the Red Sox that’s up for renewal — and Entercom wants to have enough money on hand to keep the Red Sox.

    As for that “highly devoted” audience, it hasn’t followed him (so far) in Greater New York. WOR’s recent gains in the NYC suburbs are because it has the New York Mets.

    Read the whole post. It was regarding Limbaugh’s future doing the show, his national syndication contract and the subscription webcasting-only (which is essentially international) option. A good percentage of his sizable and highly devoted audience will avail themselves of the options to listen to him regardless of the actions of a WRKO or an Indianapolis station.

    Nationally, it doesn’t matter whether the talk audience is now split between more stations in some markets or that Limbaugh has healthy competition from a Curtis & Kuby or a Jeff Kuhner in a few larger markets.

    In other words, a few large market stations do not spell “the end of an irrelevant dinosaur” or whatever overwrought rhetoric is being yammered across the internets and anti-social media.

    On the contrary, as the electorate increasingly endorses the placement of beauty-contest, skills and morals-challenged misfits in positions of power, Limbaugh’s relevance to those who would reach a bit higher only increases. The channel through which he communicates to them would be the only variable.


    Participant
    #136466

    Debut of new RKO morning show now looking at mid June.


    Participant
    #136467

    Sorry for going off topic but WOR/IHeart have actually done a pretty good job with carrying the Mets. The WOR Sports Zone is pretty enjoyable to listen, especially after Mets games.

    And once in awhile Mark Simone is enjoyable to listen to but not talking about politics 24/7 helps.

    And therein lies the problem. WOR’s current schedule is a patchwork quilt of transplanted Premiere shows (Rush, Hannity, C2C), a general talk show in Simone, sports with the Mets and the Sports Zone, and a morning show that is more reliant on the veteran 60-something sportscaster sidekick than the imported 50-something host from Tampa.

    WOR is a mess of a station.

    Recorded in Ultra Stereo, the ultimately superior cousin to Normal Stereo!


    Participant
    #136469

    Sad to have to agree about WOR being a mess. It once was a very classy station. Now… well, it’s iHurtRadio. Bleh.


    Member
    #136487

    And therein lies the problem. WOR’s current schedule is a patchwork quilt of transplanted Premiere shows (Rush, Hannity, C2C), a general talk show in Simone, sports with the Mets and the Sports Zone, and a morning show that is more reliant on the veteran 60-something sportscaster sidekick than the imported 50-something host from Tampa.

    WOR is a mess of a station.

    Agreed. Just looking at it from the point of view of a Mets fans surprised IHeart did more than expected.

    They could of ran things on the cheap and not even create the Sports Zone but it exists and I will enjoy it until the day budget cuts bring it to an end.


    Member
    #136493

    WOR’s been a mess of a station for decades. Until Buckley added Bob Grant and Savage, the station was an unlistenable old-folks home outside of, perhaps, morning drive. I’m a big Joey Reynolds fan, but his ‘OR overnight show was, uh, ponderous. And Joy Browne? Well, I guess it billed.

    iHeart hasn’t made the schedule coherent but at least it’s as contemporary as AM can get these days. I can imagine then-Clear Channel had to put on dust gloves and mold masks when they cleaned out the Buckley leftovers. Whew!


    Participant
    #136538

    As an article here on radioinsight
    says,ditto Bos. Globe,WMEX is passing on Rush. Any of his fans who want to still hear him may have to settle for stations in NH,RI,Cape Cod and Worcester.

    All things must pass..how the mighty have fallen…

    #136539

    Premiere Networks may have to change the terms under which they offer Rush.

    It’s my understanding that at the moment, they charge stations to carry the show, and I think it’s the only nationally-syndicated radio talk show that charges stations to carry it. Most other talk shows are distributed on barter (and a few even buy airtime from affiliates).

    If Premiere were to suddenly offer Rush on barter, he’ll be back in Boson before long…..maybe even on WRKO-680.


    Member
    #136545

    WMEX is passing on Rush. Any of his fans who want to still hear him may have to settle for stations in NH,RI,Cape Cod and Worcester.

    Or any www connection. Boston and Philadelphia political talk aficionados have had to rely on streaming for years to listen to some of their preferred programs. Better fidelity, no pre-emptions and if you pick the right stream, you can hear Rush starting as late as 4PM eastern. That’s before even considering recording software.


    Participant
    #136548

    WMEX is passing on Rush. Any of his fans who want to still hear him may have to settle for stations in NH,RI,Cape Cod and Worcester.

    Or any www connection. Boston and Philadelphia political talk aficionados have had to rely on streaming for years to listen to some of their preferred programs. Better fidelity, no pre-emptions and if you pick the right stream, you can hear Rush starting as late as 4PM eastern. That’s before even considering recording software.

    Autodyne, I’m frankly a bit surprised by your comment on streaming, given that your icon is that of a radio antenna and tuned circuit. 🙂

    Seriously, the few times I’ve tried to use streaming to listen to a program, whether it was Michael Graham while he was on signal-deficient AMs here, or now to Scott Shannon’s “America’s Greatest Hits” on WCBS-FM Sunday mornings, it has been a les-than-stellar experience, what with stream interruptions, uneven audio levels, and the fact that – in my case – I’m tethered to an iToy and its dock. And does anyone REALLY believe that streaming radio will replace terrestrial radio and become a mega-hit in vehicles?

    No, despite the fact that terrestrial radio more often than not has abandoned many of us (55+) in favor of the “low-information voter” crowd (which doesn’t listen to terrestrial radio much anyway), I’ll keep waving the banner for traditional AM/FM radio. Maybe more owner/operators will figure out how to make a go of it.


    Participant
    #136549

    Premiere Networks may have to change the terms under which they offer Rush.

    It’s my understanding that at the moment, they charge stations to carry the show, and I think it’s the only nationally-syndicated radio talk show that charges stations to carry it. Most other talk shows are distributed on barter (and a few even buy airtime from affiliates).

    You are correct. Darryl Parks outlined the process in his most recent blog post:

    The Rush Limbaugh Show is fee based, meaning stations pay the show’s syndicator, Premiere Networks, a rights fee based on market size, plus provide barter commercial time to broadcast the program. Limbaugh’s show reserves at least 5 minutes of barter commercial time each hour with stations agreeing to broadcast those network commercials sold by the syndicator.

    Boston’s WRKO-AM is paying around $500,000 each year in rights fees. They also provide approximately 3900 barter commercial minutes annually, which if valued at just $150 per :60 seconds is another $585,000 in cash they’re giving up. And there’s the Rush Limbaugh Morning Update, which tacks on another 780 minutes annually for another $117,000 in commercial time. All in Limbaugh’s show is costing WRKO-AM around $1.2 million dollars annually. Now consider all those advertisers, nationally and locally in the Boston market, that have no placement demands because his show is considered “toxic” and you quickly discover the financial reason WRKO-AM is declaring, “No Mas! No Mas!”

    (KTCN) Minneapolis pays around $300,000. (WFLA) Tampa pays approximately $250,000 in rights fees. WIBC-FM, which also announced they were canceling his program is paying around $150,000 in cash to broadcast his show. He’s got around 600 radio stations. Do the math. Much of the business of the Rush Limbaugh Show is not in advertising revenue from commercials, but in rights fees.

    Premiere can’t just suddenly waive the fees and turn it into all-barter because the show is dependent on those fees. iHeart still owes Rush $20M for the final year of that $400M deal, and with the company being over $20B in debt, that’s money they can’t afford to lose.

    Recorded in Ultra Stereo, the ultimately superior cousin to Normal Stereo!


    Participant
    #136550

    Autodyne, I’m frankly a bit surprised by your comment on streaming, given that your icon is that of a radio antenna and tuned circuit. :-)

    Seriously, the few times I’ve tried to use streaming to listen to a program, whether it was Michael Graham while he was on signal-deficient AMs here, or now to Scott Shannon’s “America’s Greatest Hits” on WCBS-FM Sunday mornings, it has been a les-than-stellar experience, what with stream interruptions, uneven audio levels, and the fact that – in my case – I’m tethered to an iToy and its dock. And does anyone REALLY believe that streaming radio will replace terrestrial radio and become a mega-hit in vehicles?

    Steaming audio offers a choice for those who are tired of the same “20 in a row” corporate radio playlists and uninspired morning zoo ripoffs. The biggest obstacle is the data limits from cell phone providers and data throttling from Comcast et. al. My time spent listening to terrestrial radio has diminished significantly over the past year. And it’s cool to stream stations from all over the world from the palm of my hand.

    There is no way I can answer if it will be a ‘mega-hit.’ But streaming audio will emerge as a significant force in aural content delivery, especially when terrestrial radio slowly finishes driving itself into obsolescence.

    No, despite the fact that terrestrial radio more often than not has abandoned many of us (55+) in favor of the “low-information voter” crowd (which doesn’t listen to terrestrial radio much anyway), I’ll keep waving the banner for traditional AM/FM radio. Maybe more owner/operators will figure out how to make a go of it.

    The millennial generation (which conservative talk radio signed its own death warrant by using the “low-information voters” insult to define that entire generation) has grown up post-Telecommunications Act of 1996. They never experienced the radio most of us have. And they don’t have loyalty to terrestrial radio like we had and have.

    That generation will be more of a game changer than many give them credit for.

    Recorded in Ultra Stereo, the ultimately superior cousin to Normal Stereo!


    Participant
    #136552

    Low information voters can be of any generation (or any political persuasion). Streaming is going to have it’s place, but until an actual one-to-many reliable system can come about that’s FREE, most of the audience will be on terrestrial. There isn’t near enough bandwidth, or streams available, to move every terrestrial listener to the internet. If it does happen, most people won’t be listening to a guy in his basement, but major broadcasters (or streamers) with major budgets.

    It will be interesting to see if Rush 24/7 subscriptions will spike in Indy and Boston, especially if there’s no terrestrial replacement.

    Autodyne, I’m frankly a bit surprised by your comment on streaming, given that your icon is that of a radio antenna and tuned circuit. :-)

    Seriously, the few times I’ve tried to use streaming to listen to a program, whether it was Michael Graham while he was on signal-deficient AMs here, or now to Scott Shannon’s “America’s Greatest Hits” on WCBS-FM Sunday mornings, it has been a les-than-stellar experience, what with stream interruptions, uneven audio levels, and the fact that – in my case – I’m tethered to an iToy and its dock. And does anyone REALLY believe that streaming radio will replace terrestrial radio and become a mega-hit in vehicles?

    Steaming audio offers a choice for those who are tired of the same “20 in a row” corporate radio playlists and uninspired morning zoo ripoffs. The biggest obstacle is the data limits from cell phone providers and data throttling from Comcast et. al. My time spent listening to terrestrial radio has diminished significantly over the past year. And it’s cool to stream stations from all over the world from the palm of my hand.

    There is no way I can answer if it will be a ‘mega-hit.’ But streaming audio will emerge as a significant force in aural content delivery, especially when terrestrial radio slowly finishes driving itself into obsolescence.

    No, despite the fact that terrestrial radio more often than not has abandoned many of us (55+) in favor of the “low-information voter” crowd (which doesn’t listen to terrestrial radio much anyway), I’ll keep waving the banner for traditional AM/FM radio. Maybe more owner/operators will figure out how to make a go of it.

    The millennial generation (which conservative talk radio signed its own death warrant by using the “low-information voters” insult to define that entire generation) has grown up post-Telecommunications Act of 1996. They never experienced the radio most of us have. And they don’t have loyalty to terrestrial radio like we had and have.

    That generation will be more of a game changer than many give them credit for.


    Participant
    #136554

    <p abp=”623″>Streaming is going to have it’s place, but until an actual one-to-many reliable system can come about that’s FREE, most of the audience will be on terrestrial. There isn’t near enough bandwidth, or streams available, to move every terrestrial listener to the internet.

    I’ve often wondered about that. Let’s just imagine there’s a big growth in streaming listening in the car. Now imagine what the freeways in major cities like L.A., Chicago or New York look like during rush hour. What percentage of those vehicles can be served individual streams simultaneously before the carriers’ bandwidth can’t handle it any more?

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