Recordings of Discussions Regarding Profanity

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  • Participant
    #185804

    Thanks for posting that, Mario. H***. That’s some d*** fu***** good listening right there. It gives us a lot of sh** to think about. 🙂

    But more to the point. Sadly I fear that the genie is out of the bottle. Despite some who might wish for the contrary.

    It’s funny. Growing up I remember both my grandfather’s using profanity. Little was thought of it. Little was objected to. If I may paraphrase Jean Shepard, they both were “true masters.”

    I asked my dad, Wabash College degreed in literature, about it. Maybe it was just my dad’s way of justifying his father’s word choice, but he explained that for my grandfather’s generation, it was simply part of the language. There was no ill will intended. Only that those words were as much a part of language as “cat” and “dog” and “sun” and “moon.”

    A great example is how George Clooney masters the delivery of that language as part of his dialogue in the Coen Brother’s movie “O Brother, Where Art Thou.” I hear my grandfather’s everytime I hear Clooney deliver the line “consider the lillies of the god damned field…” Clooney studied a great uncle of his to develop the cadence used playing Everett McGill. That uncle, as was my dad’s father, were from the same part of Kentucky.

    Point? Sadly, I suspect that today we have a generation, versed only in a desire to shock and offend. Profanity is easy. What is far more difficult is to find the way to clearly communicate a point in a way that doesn’t stoop to profanity’s base level. As my dad always told me, water seeks its own level. Those who claim art in their use of such language, at least in my view, are producing anything but…

    • This reply was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by  ma gee. Reason: Seems the site doesn't automatically replace profanity with ***
    • This reply was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by  ma gee.
    • This reply was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by  ma gee.
    #185816

    I had believed a certain radio station connected to the address I had mentioned near the bottom of my previous message (a certain WGN-AM) often had profanity in their radio programming in years past and had wished that it would not have any more profanity.


    Participant
    #185818

    Sorry, Mario. I’ve listened to WGN for close to 50 years. You must be thinking of a different radio station.

    #185819

    Sorry, Mario. I’ve listened to WGN for close to 50 years. You must be thinking of a different radio station.

    No (I would suggest listening to some recordings on the site with the address I had mentioned in my previous message, specifically recordings for certain parts of it that appeared to have had been related to a certain “Nick Digilio”).

    Participant
    #185822

    Frankly, Mario, I don’t have time to listen to hours of Nick Digilio. If you have a specific example, post a link to the audio and I’ll listen to it.

    Here’s what I do know. Mr. Digilio got his start at WGN with Steve King and the late Roy Leonard. That’s all I need to know. If he had Roy Leonard’s approval, he has mine. Of all the broadcasters I’ve enjoyed in over 50 plus years of listening to radio, Mr. Leonard ranks near — if not at — the top as a true communicator.

    Roy Leonard was erudite to the extreme. He was a master communicator, with a word choice that reflected great wisdom and great brevity. It was a daily struggle to choose between listening to Roy Leonard on WGN and the equally gifted Studs Terkel on WFMT.

    Now, more to the issue. Yes, Nick Digilio may at times use profanity. But is it only to shock or offend as with some of today’s broadcasters? No. Nick Digilio understands the people of the town he grew up in and broadcasts to today. As it was in my grandfather’s time, profanity is common place in the language of Chicago. No ill will implied or intended.

    Profanity may not be something I enjoy hearing. But I do understand why Nick Digilio uses such language. And yes, as my dad did with my grandfather, I will allow him the space to do just that. He’s communicating to his late night target audience in their own language. I’d be surprised and disappointed if he were to do anything less.

    You and I and those who think in a similar fashion have a choice. Turn the radio off. Turn the radio to another station. But no, I’m not going to condemn the exemplary 97 year history of WGN simply because of one overnight personality.

    And allow me to direct one more question to you. Is your strong objection to profanity based on simply linguistic grounds — or is it a more personal religious or moral objection?

    #185825

    Frankly, Mario, I don’t have time to listen to hours of Nick Digilio. If you have a specific example, post a link to the audio and I’ll listen to it.

    https://wgnradio.com/2019/03/12/nick-digilio-03-12-19-cops-30th-anniversary-pet-names-discontinued-oreos/ (note: the recording had such examples between these points of its length: 29:00 and 30:00)

    Is your strong objection to profanity based on simply linguistic grounds — or is it a more personal religious or moral objection?

    My objections to profanity were based mainly on what you might call “linguistic” and “moral” grounds.

    Participant
    #185827

    So you’re talking about his two uses of “hell” inside that one minute?

    Bluntly, you need to get past it. I’m certain that far more viewers heard far worse in the reality show Digilio was discussing than anything he’s ever said on WGN.

    Bringing me to what in my mind would be the greater question. Where is your concern about that? Why worry about the overnight personality on WGN, when, as I’ve said, day in and day out far worse is presented to far larger audiences through radio, podcasts, television and movies via antenna, theater, satellite and streaming?

    Look at the front page of any newspaper and you quickly see a dying world needing change. Allow me to suggest that you start to focus on the bigger picture and help to correct those issues before worrying one more second about some overnight host swearing on a long past its prime AM station in Chicago.

    Do that, and I suspect your issues with language will fix itself. As for me, end of conversation.

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