Salt Lake AM DX ?

RI Community Forums General Topics DX & Reception Salt Lake AM DX ?

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This topic contains 1 reply, has 2 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Curt Schwarzwalder Curt Schwarzwalder 4 months, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #171991
    Profile photo of Steve Green
    Steve Green
    Participant

    I’ve never been any farther west (or even north) of Duluth MN.    So I wouldn’t know things such as salt-water path reception in the vicinity of the Great Salt Lake.

    And there doesn’t appear to be much in the way of civilization occupying the west side of the Lake.

    But does anyone — DXers and other experimenters — know if the Great Salt Lake holds any noteworthy, exaggerated or enhanced endowments in this crucial AM reception realm?

    * * * * * * *

    (I’d once asked if Nor’easters would create a salt-water path inland.     After all,    every inch/foot of snow on the ground would be exhaust from off the ocean.    But I was told,  ‘No.’ )

     

     

    #171996
    Profile photo of Curt Schwarzwalder
    Curt Schwarzwalder
    Participant
    Steve Green wrote:  “I’ve never been any farther west (or even north) of Duluth MN. So I wouldn’t know things such as salt-water path reception in the vicinity of the Great Salt Lake.”

    I swam in the Great Salt Lake once as a kid, and I can tell you it provides great buoyancy.  I had a GE P-975 AM/FM 15 transistor portable radio with me on the trip, and the Delco AM radio in the car (the one with the totally linear dial scale) and enjoyed listening to the various ‘Top 40’ stations at the time, but wasn’t in to systematic DXing.

    The FCC M3 Ground Conductivity map shows a value of 15 millimhos per meter in that area of Utah, which beats the heck out of the 2 to 4 in our area of Pennsylvania, but far short of the open ocean estimate of 5000.  The conductivity drops to 4 in the mountains east of SLC, according to the map.

    The lake is fairly shallow, so it isn’t exactly like the ocean. And almost no one lives to the west of the lake, in the Bonneville Salt Flats. So, how much stronger KSL 1160 (for instance) is across the lake than it would be if the lake suddenly disappeared, who knows?

    I can’t find a measurement of the Great Salt Lake itself, but speaking of Duluth, the reading on Lake Superior is just 7, where on land in northern Minnesota it’s 8.

    Other Great Lakes readings on the map are: Lake Michigan 25.7, Lake Huron 18.9, Lake Erie 28, Lake Ontario 26.5 – but, of course, these are fresh water lakes.

    -Curt

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