The 'banana republic' sound of CBS-FM

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This topic contains 11 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Steve Green 3 months, 2 weeks ago.

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
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  • #174997

    Charles Everett
    Participant

    No, CBS Radio is not putting together a channel for the clothing-store chain. CBS-FM in recent weeks has sounded like a station you would come across in a Third World country.

    The long guitar solo that forms the coda of “Hotel California” was cut off halfway through. “Go Your Own Way” was upcut early in its own guitar-filled coda. Two songs by Santana were similarly dumped out of before they finished. Plus there were ads for Memorial Day sales that aired long after the holiday.

    And this is the radio station that’s #1 6+ in the most recent Nielsen Audio PPM survey!

    [HT to Jerry Del Colliano, who brought up these examples on his subscription-required website.]

    #175003

    Bruce
    Participant

    I really miss WCBS-FM as it was programmed by Joe McCoy.  Those were the days.  Now they don’t want listeners who grew up in the 50s, 60s, and early 70s.  Although it is flawed, you can’t argue with success as it consistently ranks #1 or #2 in the ratings.

    #175399

    Josh Diaz
    Participant

    People, You can’t tune to 89.1 WFDU in Teaneck, NJ if you want the former CBS-FM playlist plus almost all of the other stations flipped formats to current pop music. There’s little variety so 80s and 90s need to be somewhere on the NY Radio Dial.

    #175412

    Charles Everett
    Participant

    In the 21st century, Oldies has become a fringe format. Fanboys worship fringe formats. Responsible broadcasters do not.

    BTW, Magic 98.3 in New Jersey plays “Go Your Own Way” all the way through, unlike CBS-FM.

    I really miss WCBS-FM as it was programmed by Joe McCoy.

    And I don’t.

     

    #175416

    Bruce
    Participant

    What is wrong with “fringe formats”?  There are many kinds of music that are not heard on radio stations in large cities because it not appealing to advertisers.  If WLNG and WMTR were not making money they would not play oldies.  Apparently, oldies can sell in exurban markets such as Morristown and the Hamptons.  During the day I can pick up WMTR which does not stream from my home in Queens.  I often listen to WLNG.com.

    In my opinion Joe McCoy belongs in the Radio Hall of Fame.

    #175438

    Charles Everett
    Participant

    Yeah, the PD who pissed all over the 70’s pop culture revival during the 1990s. CBS-FM wouldn’t touch anything related to “Pulp Fiction” or “Mamma Mia!” if the station’s life depended on it. Banana republic thinking at its finest.

    #175439

    MTN Productions
    Participant

    In the 21st century, Oldies has become a fringe format. Fanboys worship fringe formats. Responsible broadcasters do not.

    BTW, Magic 98.3 in New Jersey plays “Go Your Own Way” all the way through, unlike CBS-FM.

    I really miss WCBS-FM as it was programmed by Joe McCoy.

    And I don’t.

    Me too! I respect your opinion. I used to listened to WCBS-FM back in the oldies period (circa 1972-2005). It was a pretty darn good oldies station playing a lot of 50’s, 60’s and 70’s when Joe McCoy was PD at the station during his time period. The music was excellent, the jingles were perfect and the rest of the station sounds really good. As of now, I hate the new jingles for WCBS-FM, Reelworld made the new jingles for CBS-FM and they are godawful!!!! That is why the JAM and Frank Gari jingles doesn’t exist anymore. Everything has changed 10 years after the station returned from “Jack”. 10 years ago, I remember listening to the return of CBS-FM playing a lot more 60’s 70’s and a little bit of 80’s, and then, the station finally screwed up 10 years later with no 60’s, but they’re playing very little 70’s, 80’s and now the 90’s with a little bit from the new millennium.

    As of now, thanks to WLNG, they survived the oldies format, along with two stations in the Hudson Valley and Albany areas such as WGNY-FM’s “Fox Oldies”, the home of Bob O and Joe Allen (aka Sunny Joe) which is the show I listened to, but I prefer JJ Carter on WBPM, but if JJ’s not there, I listened to Sunny Joe on another station which is filling in for JJ Carter.

    And up in Albany, there’s WROW’s “Magic 590/100.5”. They played the same oldies as WGNY-FM did. Those were three competing oldies stations, and my favorites were Bob Johnson when I listened to for an hour after Brian “The Cannon” Bannon on WLNG, and Richie Norris (aka Rockin’ Richie) does a tremendous job hosting the “Saturday Night at the Oldies” show. I listened to it for 6 hours and it is a fun show to listen. They played the songs that you’ve heard on stations like WGNY-FM’s “Fox Oldies” and WBPM as well as throw in a few soft AC songs that you can’t get anywhere else, just like WELJ out on Long Island, and a few MOR/standards just like the good old WNEW-AM and WQEW.

    “Fox Oldies” plays much of the same, except they throw in a bunch of album cuts and classic rock sides that doesn’t fit the overall presentation of oldies. I heard Led Zeppelin, Janis Joplin, and other stuff like the Who, Blue Oyster Cult, and others, that doesn’t fit well with the oldies format. When was the last time you’ve heard “Don’t Fear the Reaper” by Blue Oyster Cult or “Whole Lotta Love” by Led Zeppelin? I can’t stand these songs played on “Fox Oldies”. These classic rock stuff needs to stop. They need to focus on playing oldies, play the songs that were hits, play some 70’s and some stuff that you can get anywhere else like “Magic” did. “Fox Oldies” is a mad house. They played 500 song played over and over and over and over again. But it needs to update the playlist a lot further until you move forward to play a few 80’s hits. “Magic 590/100.5” on the other hand plays a handful of 80’s hits while “Fox Oldies” does not, except for Dick Bartley with his “Rock & Roll’s Greatest Hits” every Saturday night where they play some 80’s hits as well as some later 70’s hits which is a 4-hour show playing classic hits which is a specialty show.

    Aside from that, I have airchecks from “Fox Oldies’, WBPM and “Magic 590/100.5” which I will be posting it later on. I did posted them from Memorial Day weekend as well.

    To leave you at best, the only two of my favorite shows on the current CBS-FM are Scott Shannon and Ross Britton. Those are my favorites, and I am a huge Scott Shannon fan, but I used to listened to Z100 back in the 1980’s and so does Ross Britton. I have the “Z100 Morning Zoo’s Greatest Hits” album collection if anyone who has interested to hear them throughout the 12 volumes in the series.

    Once again, I respect your opinion, and I missed the good old CBS-FM. Now I can listen to one of the three oldies stations that I missed since CBS-FM was great at that time when Joe McCoy was PD.

    I really miss WCBS-FM as it was programmed by Joe McCoy. Those were the days. Now they don’t want listeners who grew up in the 50s, 60s, and early 70s. Although it is flawed, you can’t argue with success as it consistently ranks #1 or #2 in the ratings.

    Once again, I’ve been said it all the time. Why not go to Poughkeepsie and listen to WGNy-FM’s “Fox Oldies”, and then up north to Albany and listen to WROW’s “Magic 590/100.5” and WABY, and then it goes to Sag Harbor and listen to WLNG. They got their oldies fix. Or listen to “Rewound Radio” as well. You have other choices to go to. Make your pick. Choose any station to get your 50’s, 60’s and 70’s fix.

    And one forgot one thing to mention, WKNY did a great job hosting the Saturday afternoon oldies show for 6 hours, and it was great. Warren Lawrence did a great job playing the oldies that he loved so much. And then, by 4 PM, they played great doo-wop songs and street corner harmonies for two straight hours. Just the like the way Don K Reed did with his long-running “Doo-Wop Shop” which has been on WCBS-FM from 1975 through 2002 where he hosted every Sunday night for 27 years, going back to the days of Gus Gossert on WPIX-FM in the 1970’s.

    #175446

    schmave
    Participant

    What is wrong with “fringe formats”? There are many kinds of music that are not heard on radio stations in large cities because it not appealing to advertisers. If WLNG and WMTR were not making money they would not play oldies. Apparently, oldies can sell in exurban markets such as Morristown and the Hamptons. During the day I can pick up WMTR which does not stream from my home in Queens. I often listen to WLNG.com.

    In my opinion Joe McCoy belongs in the Radio Hall of Fame.

    There is nothing wrong with “fringe formats,” but to say oldies counts as one is absolutely ridiculous. Sure, the music Baby Boomers grew up with, many people my age (I am 39) love as a result and still is used with some regularity in movies, TV shows, etc. despite its age is a fringe format. Give me a break.

    #175450

    Bruce
    Participant

    I don’t understand why oldies are heard in commercials and appear in movies quite regularly but do not appeal to advertisers.  Younger people do listen to the music of the 60s and 70s.  Advertisers are trying to reach people aged 25-54.

    #175460

    Charles Everett
    Participant

    Younger people do listen to the music of the 60s and 70s.

    Got any proof?

    There is nothing wrong with “fringe formats,” but to say oldies counts as one is absolutely ridiculous.

    It certainly has become a fringe format when big-signal FMs in PPM markets transition out of it if they haven’t dropped it altogether. Especially on stations like CBS-FM that dump out of songs before they finish.

    /Which is the original point of this thread.

     

    #175470

    mimo
    Participant

    Whether anyone likes it or not, the oldies ship has sailed, and it had a good run.  It’s just not good business sense to play songs that are 50-60 years old all day every day.  People tire of them, even people raised in that era.  There may be a few younger people who like some of the music, but they’re far from the majority.  The few oldies stations left are down at the bottom of the pile in under 35 demos.  It’s their grandparents music.  Nirvana is “oldies” to today’s  youth.  The 80’s and 90’s will also be phased out of radio in a few years, as much as I hate that idea  The music of our youth gets old, and goes out of style….and stops being profitable, and, marketable.

    Movies are not radio.  Music in movies and tv is used to set a mood.  You don’t hear an entire song in a movie anyway, you’ll hear a few seconds, and that’s it.  As far as commercials go, some of those songs may be old enough to be public domain.  Someone might want to correct me but I read that most songs lose their copyright after 50 years.  Back in the 50’s and 60’s, a lot of people thought the music wouldn’t last long.  They were wrong, but they were right when they said it wouldn’t be popular forever.  I never thought I’d see the day when the Beatles weren’t played on radio anymore, but that day has arrived in many cities.

    #175777

    Steve Green
    Participant

    Another thing to consider,  Mimo,  is the possibility that the various forms of marketing progress have left music radio in the dust.   New products and leisure entertainment devices seem to’ve been arriving faster than ever.

    One example here vis-a-vis music:     Many folks here will remember when Billboard (most likely back in the Seventies iIrc) would run a small but still full-color/front page ad for some ‘hot new group’.    The act would be available in stores soon.    I don’t know how many of those sales pitches worked.     I had two reactions to those blatant business cards :   1)  who is considering this next Beatles or Presley ‘hot’ if no one outside A&R people even heard of them? … and  2)  I sensed a certain ‘get-with-it’ sneer to the campaign.  ‘Your music is becoming obsolete!    We said so!’

    Of course,   one has to factor in other upgrades and conveniences.    Newer,  ‘improved’ models of cars is one.   ‘That heap you bought from us last year?   Trade it in.   It’s obsolete.’

    Personal listening devices?

    Personal computers?

    The recent carrot-on-a-stick campaign with seemingly every internet website suddenly offering — how original — daily Top Ten (blanks) lists to click through …..

    We all recognize these as marketing ploys,  of course.     Or we should.    These gambits go back so far that I forgot if ‘sales’ was the second-oldest profession or the oldest one.

    I’m retired.  I have white hair.   I’m cynical and I’m impossible to sell to.    Granted.    But another thing to remember is that I sensed this pushy glitz and this attrition cleansing start to gain steam back when I was in my 20’s.

    For Oldies nowadays …. during those times I have vast leisure time to enjoy,   I’m at the computer.   And so is the wife.     The time that we and others spend listening and chatting with Top Shelf Oldies,  Rewound Radio and GoodTimeOldies would frighten today’s terrestrial music programmers and salespeople.     Our ship has sailed,   allright.    But it’s only docked at a different pier.

     

     

     

     

     

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