What of 103.9 and 103.5 now?

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  • Posted In: Hudson Valley / Albany


  • Participant
    #186918

    What purpose would it serve to turn 103.5 into a relay of a Utica station? WIBX carries Limbaugh and Hannity, who are heard loud and clear in the Capital Region on WGY.

    As for 103.9 going Soft Oldies you really have to shake your head. Unless you are in Florida or San Francisco, Soft Oldies is seen as the format of last resort.


    Participant
    #186919

    What would it hurt? 950 & 810 already have signal overlap. 103.5’s transmitter is actually closer to Utica than it is to Albany, and puts a city grade signal over Herkimer County, just short of downtown Utica itself, and 950 has no FM counterpart like WGY does with 103.1. I really only used it as a quick example, as Townsquare owns & operates 950.
    In a better world, 103.5 would have AC, CHR, Country or other mainstream format on it, serving a region that’s been populated with full power FM’s only supplying:
    A-A-A Non-comm WEXT (97.7)
    Chartocks Socialist Public Radio (93.3)
    Two…no, Three godcasters (89.9, 97.3, 101.9)
    and a Country music format (101.1)
    Anything else that’s local to the region, are 250 watt AM-to-FM translators covering a few towns, most with abysmal signals.

    But I will repeat…. 103.5 is not an *Albany* station. It’s a Mohawk Valley signal, with the bulk of it’s Grade A coverage in Fulton, Montgomery, Schoharie and Herkimer Counties. It should be serving the area it intended to when the license was granted, instead of trying to be a fringe signal with a fringe format. Which begs the question… how many “ALT”s do the self-identifying ‘hipsters’ in Albany need? lol


    Participant
    #186921

    Please, no more country stations up here, unless they are classic.  I have WFFG, WGNA,  WBUG, WKLI, WJEN, WOKO.

    (I thought Chartock was a satire.)


    Participant
    #186926

    There’s also a link to “The Breeze” website which is located at:

    https://1039thebreezealbany.com/

    There is also streaming included as well. I hope “The Breeze” would do better, because, it’s going to compete with WROW’s “Magic 590/100.5” for the oldies/classic hits format, and WTRY-FM’s “98.3 TRY” for their classic hits format, and also WGNY-FM’s “Oldies 98.9” which is also “Magic’s“ chief competitor, because of playing mostly classic rock mixing with oldies for example Janis Joplin, Led Zeppelin and Jimmi Hendrix as well, while “Magic” doesn’t due to overlapping songs. Both “Magic” and its new station “The Breeze” will have a lot of competition.

    I noticed that on the Radio-Locator site that “The Breeze” at 103.9’s signal is coming well in Catskill and Hudson which is in the upper Hudson Valley, but it doesn’t come in well when you reach Saugerties and Kingston due to some interference with another station.

    I hope Hudson Valley doesn’t have a soft AC format at the moment, but let’s see what happens.


    Participant
    #186931

    ….WGNY-FM’s “Oldies 98.9” which is also “Magic’s“ chief competitor,…

    WGNY… entirely different market and it isn’t a competitor of *any* kind in Albany. Cant even be heard in most of the area.

    And a quick comment on the “format of last resort” quip. Terrestrial radio only has last resorts to turn to now. Millennial’s and people in the once-coveted 25-54 age group, they’re disappearing to streaming and downloads. Terrestrial broadcast radio…it’s dying out. The only people still using it as a primary source of their music listening… Boomers & older Gen X’ers. And they don’t care two squats about all the mumble rap & hip hop, all the modern rock being squeaked out by whiny 20-somethings, the lousy Alt-rock that can barely get any listeners at all…. Boomers want news, talk, classic rock, classic hits, and radio that isn’t so heavily female-centric like The River, FLY 92, B95… even WGNA. Modern country is just redneck Top 40 these days. No real difference in production or sound, just imaging.

    Just listen to what companies like iHeart and Entercom are promoting. They’re pushing their respective streaming services & stations. Terrestrial radio as we know it… it’ll be on the scrap heap of history in two decades or less, reduced to basic informational services for mobile consumption and perhaps a handful of small town stations that just seem to keep chugging along hyperserving their communities. Once the switch to full multiplexed digital broadcasting happens, that’ll be all she wrote. The clock is ticking. For now, broadcasters have no choice but to chase the older demos with formats that appeal to them. Sorry kids.


    Participant
    #186934

    Of course terrestrial broadcasters are now chasing older demos. Any time a station adopts The Breeze, radio geeks go wild for it like dogs in heat. Then why do you not see it in more cities? Philadelphia but not Phoenix? Seattle but not Salt Lake City? Albany but not Albuquerque? It’s all about the demographics plus the viable niches — you can’t separate the two when you look at local market conditions.

    By the way, only one Albany station has a viable signal in Newburgh and that’s the NPR using a translator.


    Participant
    #186935

    ” they don’t care two squats about all the mumble rap & hip hop, all the modern rock being squeaked out by whiny 20-somethings, the lousy Alt-rock that can barely get any listeners at all…. Boomers want news, talk, classic rock, classic hits, and radio that isn’t so heavily female-centric like The River, FLY 92, B95… even WGNA. Modern country is just redneck Top 40 these days. No real difference in production or sound, just imaging.

    For now, broadcasters have no choice but to chase the older demos with formats that appeal to them. ”

    —I do agree with all that, but am confused by the final sentence.  Are they chasing or are they choosing not to? I find few stations doing any chasing. Up here in Glens Falls, there are many stations and zero substance, although there is an AM talk outlet.


    Participant
    #186936

    With all due respect, Washington, DC has a format hole the size of the Lincoln Memorial in Hot AC when WRQX “Mix 107.3” shut down. A top-10 station that was itself a successful rehab effort by Cumulus management after the Dickey brothers/Jan Jeffries tried to take it CHR (failing miserably in the process)… and it got shut down completely. No station group has picked the format up, because no remaining station group in the market had an expendable station for Hot AC to begin with.

    Here’s the new normal: radio station groups make decisions based on what format can flank the others in their group. That’s why Radio One trotted out “Boom” in multiple markets, someone in the company thought it could flank their mainstream urban stations (like KDAY has long been successful with KPWR) but guess what, it didn’t work. Entercom trotted out “Alt” on multiple legacy CBS FMs mostly because their CEO loves the format, thus, they’ll stick with it as it is a lower-tier format that can be sold as an ad combo with actual successful stations; see 92.3 New York paired with CBS-FM, WNSH and WNEW.

    Superclusters like in Philly or Boston or New York don’t have an expendable format for something like mainstream/soft AC when they have stations either very successful or as flankers. Outside of Entercom trotting out mainstream/soft AC in Seattle and Detroit or urban oldies in Chicago, they are not going to make massive roll-outs of fad formats along the lines of “Jammin Oldies” or “Boom” any more. Cumulus’ ouster of Lew and John Dickey and iHeart’s usage of FM HD subchannel/translators for trademark filing purposes pretty much see to that.

    Recorded in Ultra Stereo, the ultimately superior cousin to Normal Stereo!


    Participant
    #186937

    ” Up here in Glens Falls, there are many stations and zero substance, although there is an AM talk outlet.

    Well, let’s break it down. You have two local CHR stations (95.9, 107.1), a local country station (100.3), a local sports station (1230/97.9), a local talk station (1450, albeit not much local content), a local classic rock station (101.7), a couple of regional Christian outlets, generous access to three public radio outlets (NCPR, VPR & WAMC), you have Magic 590 piped in (1410/96.9) and a local AC/Classic Hits station with WCKM (98.5) filling the Full Service hole that WWSC provided in the 60’s & 70’s and WENU did in the 80’s. Thats a pretty well rounded set of stations with mainstream formats for a very small market, thats not exactly booming economically, with access to a fair number of fringe signals. That’s a lot of radio for any exurban/rural market. Many of these have local talent behind the mic too. Not sure why anyone would think there’s no substance in that. Should consider yourselves lucky. What more does GFL need? Bring it back to the days of two AM & FM combos?

    Participant
    #186938

    You have two local CHR stations (95.9, 107.1), a local country station (100.3), a local sports station (1230/97.9), a local talk station (1450, albeit not much local content), a local classic rock station (101.7), a couple of regional Christian outlets, generous access to three public radio outlets (NCPR, VPR & WAMC), you have Magic 590 piped in (1410/96.9) and a local AC/Classic Hits station with WCKM (98.5) filling the Full Service hole

     

    —It’s not about labels, it’s about effort , imagination, distinguishibility.

    95.9, 107.1, 100.3, 101.7, 98.5. Very loud overlapping clanging guitars. I mention these to my friends, they say yeah it all sounds the same, generally.   100.3 is one of 6 country signals receivable here, all redneck top 40. 101.7 is less than any other classic rock station, continuous screeching. The 98.5 “service” hole is commercials, alternating with songs never heard or tired of.  Local sports?: that sounds nice, but it’s NBA, plus what they had for breakfast.

    Local talk, I credited that. Other than that, you also mention non-commercial stations, and unnecessary Albany duplication, which  I meant to exclude. For variety, I have to reach to Albany or Rutland.


    Participant
    #186941

    distinguishibility… broadcasting in general has lacked that for a long time.  The only radio station that even remotely conjures that in my mind is WEXT. But if that music isnt one’s bag, then I’m not sure such an animal exists in this region.
    I tend to like talk radio, and Talk 1300 fills the bill reasonably well in both AM & PM drive, and during lunchtime. Funny (yet sad) how the heritage 50kw talker can only muster one 3 hour local program on weekdays, with very typical morning radio vapidness which i find unlistenable.
    The rest of my listening is via streaming since there’s no rolling news station anywhere nearby except for Boston (yawn) or NYC (too high spot load). So it’s KNX in the background while I work most days.
    And that brings this full circle. In the coming years, radio will morph into something more along the lines of european broadcasting – one radio station/format distributed nationally via local transmitters, not unlike how EMF distributes their Air1 & K-Love services.
    So i guess i can only say enjoy whats around while it still exists.


    Participant
    #186942

    “. Funny (yet sad) how the heritage 50kw talker can only muster one 3 hour local program on weekdays, with very typical morning radio vapidness which i find unlistenable.”

    —That’s an important point! The region’s primary station has become automated, except at breakfast. What they do is largely token: brief news (WGDJ does it better, but they don’t have Glens Falls reception), token weather (today & tonight in 2 sentences), token sports (NY & Boston pro scores),  and a staff too lazy to announce things like school closings  and storms. “For those who have turned on their radio to get the closings, there are some, go buy a computer.”

    I appreciate the Syracuse sports, and the job that Chuck & Kelly do on the hard news non-fluff segments. But I just can’t stay with the new music-new movies-stupid criminals etc. (click).  WGY is about the best around, and I give them a complacent C+.


    Participant
    #186943

    ….WGNY-FM’s “Oldies 98.9” which is also “Magic’s“ chief competitor,…

    WGNY… entirely different market and it isn’t a competitor of *any* kind in Albany. Cant even be heard in most of the area.

    LOL. I’ve never heard Fox Oldies as a factor in anything besides their home market and MTN always brings it or Magic up, without fail.

    And a quick comment on the “format of last resort” quip. Terrestrial radio only has last resorts to turn to now. Millennial’s and people in the once-coveted 25-54 age group, they’re disappearing to streaming and downloads. Terrestrial broadcast radio…it’s dying out. The only people still using it as a primary source of their music listening… Boomers & older Gen X’ers. And they don’t care two squats about all the mumble rap & hip hop, all the modern rock being squeaked out by whiny 20-somethings, the lousy Alt-rock that can barely get any listeners at all…. Boomers want news, talk, classic rock, classic hits, and radio that isn’t so heavily female-centric like The River, FLY 92, B95… even WGNA. Modern country is just redneck Top 40 these days. No real difference in production or sound, just imaging.

    This is also the new normal. Charles can do his boring and tiresome denigrating shtick (like he always does) with posts like “radio geeks go wild for it like dogs in heat” but the fact of the matter is, radio is a legacy utility, and “geeks” are getting older and dying off.

    Face it, it’s a changing world. And as superclusters can no longer support formats in the 18-34 demo, they’ll go older. They have no choice. Radio hurt itself irrevocably by complacency as the youngest generation was exposed to different, non-linear content delivery methods.

    Recorded in Ultra Stereo, the ultimately superior cousin to Normal Stereo!


    Participant
    #186944

    As Nathan pointed out….it’s a very different world in 2019.

    People who used to be passionate about listening to radio stations in pre-internet years, often did so because there simply weren’t a lot of easy, viable solutions for music, information, & communication.

    Sure, you could play tunes you recorded onto iPods; play CDs or earlier cassettes or way back when 8-tracks, but most folks listened to radio stations pretty much because they had no other easy choices.

    As a veteran of many decades working in radio, I don’t think there’s a whole lot ANY radio station (or streaming “station”) can do to significantly turn radio back into #1 for music again. Why wait when on-demand, 24/7/365, worldwide websites & social media are there?


    Participant
    #186953

    105.7 is now WQBK and 103.9 is now WPBZ…

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