Why Doesn't WCBS-FM 101.1 Actually Play Oldies Anymore?

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This topic contains 68 replies, has 36 voices, and was last updated by  silkie 2 months, 1 week ago.

Viewing 9 posts - 61 through 69 (of 69 total)
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  • #143645

    Steve West
    Participant

    That’s probably one of the most popular questions with regard to any “oldies” station in the country. There are a few interesting facts about the format. Such as, when the first Oldies stations began to appear, they generally began as a weekend special – as an experiment. In 1972, WBZ Boston, which had been a Top 40 station during the 1960s, aired its first “Grease Weekend”, featuring the music and deejays of the 1950s. They actually flew in some of the top jocks in Top 40 radio for that weekend to augment the WBZ staff: Dick Biondi from WLS Chicago, Wolfman Jack from (I think) XERB, and some others whom I can’t remember off the top of my head.

    Getting off track.

    The first oldies STATIONS were playing music that was basically 5-15 years old. When the OLDIES brand burnt out about 10 years ago, the average age of the music was 25-40 years old. Its safe to say that the original Oldies stations back in the 1970s and early 80s were square in the middle of the money demo. Today, that demo is mainly retired on Social Security. Fixed income listeners don’t buy what they don’t need. And that’s the answer. Radio can’t sell that format because advertisers won’t spend money where they won’t get a return on their investment.

    WCBS-FM probably won’t make an actual format change any time soon. occasional format tweaks are to be expected, along with a blurring of the music lines, as later music shares a lot more ‘sameness’ than earlier tunes. But a format change? What would they flip to? Everything including Country, Hip Hop and Classic Rock are covered.

    #143652

    davideduardo
    Participant

    There are a few interesting facts about the format. Such as, when the first Oldies stations began to appear, they generally began as a weekend special – as an experiment. In 1972, WBZ Boston, which had been a Top 40 station during the 1960s, aired its first “Grease Weekend”, featuring the music and deejays of the 1950s.

    The first oldies stations I am aware of were both in the Washington, DC market. Barry Richards’ programmed WMOD with oldies in mid to late 1968 and on. Local personality Jack Alix did “Million Dollar WEEL” on 1310 in Fairfax, also playing pure oldies and starting in 1969.

    #143653

    MTN Productions
    Participant

    That’s probably one of the most popular questions with regard to any “oldies” station in the country. There are a few interesting facts about the format. Such as, when the first Oldies stations began to appear, they generally began as a weekend special – as an experiment. In 1972, WBZ Boston, which had been a Top 40 station during the 1960s, aired its first “Grease Weekend”, featuring the music and deejays of the 1950s. They actually flew in some of the top jocks in Top 40 radio for that weekend to augment the WBZ staff: Dick Biondi from WLS Chicago, Wolfman Jack from (I think) XERB, and some others whom I can’t remember off the top of my head.

    Getting off track.

    The first oldies STATIONS were playing music that was basically 5-15 years old. When the OLDIES brand burnt out about 10 years ago, the average age of the music was 25-40 years old. Its safe to say that the original Oldies stations back in the 1970s and early 80s were square in the middle of the money demo. Today, that demo is mainly retired on Social Security. Fixed income listeners don’t buy what they don’t need. And that’s the answer. Radio can’t sell that format because advertisers won’t spend money where they won’t get a return on their investment.

    WCBS-FM probably won’t make an actual format change any time soon. occasional format tweaks are to be expected, along with a blurring of the music lines, as later music shares a lot more ‘sameness’ than earlier tunes. But a format change? What would they flip to? Everything including Country, Hip Hop and Classic Rock are covered.

    Thanks for bringing this up about the oldies format and the whole. I was a longtime CBS-FM loyal listener since the 1980’s and all through the 90’s when the station was playing oldies from the 50’s, 60’s and 70’s, and CBS-FM was the king of the oldies format.

    The first oldies station in New York City was WOR-FM when the station started playing Top 40 along with a mix of oldies that are 5-15 years old between 1954 through 1968. WOR-FM was the first FM Top 40 radio station under Bill Drake, and one of many Drake-Chenaut radio stations across the country like WRKO, CKLW, KFRC and KHJ.

    To get back on CBS-FM, the station was doing a great job at the time during the Joe McCoy era, and they brought so many great talented DJ’s to the station including Cousin Bruce Morrow, Harry Harrison, Ron Lundy, Bob Shannon, Bobby Jay, Don K Reed, Norm N Nite, Steve O’Brien and Bill Brown. All part of the CBS-FM’s staple of DJ’s.

    By 2005, the station flipped to “Jack” and took the station to a nose dive after two years, and when the station returned in 2007, CBS-FM was back on top playing 60’s through 80’s music. When the station moved forward in time, they’re playing 90’s music including Santana’s “Smooth” with Rob Thomas of Matchbox 20, and that song was #1 back in 1999 and it was the last #1 song of the 90’s, and also the last song of the 20th century.

    As now, CBS-FM now has Scott Shannon doing mornings, and I love Scott Shannon, and he is still the best long after his years at “Z100”. I love the “Z100 Morning Zoo’s Greatest Hits” album series and Scott was in his prime putting together an album of sketches and phone calls during his “Z100” years. They thrown in some comedy bits just like “Saturday Night Live” did. As of now, CBS-FM doesn’t play any 60’s songs that much due to people over 50 years of age.

    Look at the stations that plays 50’s and 60’s oldies. There are many choices to get their oldies fix Look at my three competing radio stations for example WGNY-FM’s “Fox Oldies”, they’re playing the same oldies music that we all know from back in the CBS-FM days when it was an oldies station, but they throw in many of these classic rock songs that are not oldies which ended up somewhere on classic rock stations like WAXQ’s “Q104”, for example “(Don’t Fear) The Reaper” by Blue Oyster Cult (same goes with CBS-FM in its current form), and then too much Bob Dylan songs and Janis Joplin stuff along with Jimi Hendrix and the Doors and some few album rock cuts since the days of WNEW-FM. The only DJ that he did middays on “Fox Oldies” is Bob O, he sounded great on the station, and he does a great job. I was working at my job everyday and we had “Fox Oldies” on, and I’m aware of those “Fox Oldies” jingles that play way too much and too stale according to “limegrass69’s” comments on their made-up stories on other posts. I have so many Bob O airchecks in my collection. I remember last year on your Airchexx that you’ve posted a brief aircheck of Van Ritshie, but I don’t like Van Ritshie, because it’s so boring, but I think Scott Shannon is the best in my book.

    Up in Albany, there’s WROW’s “Magic 590”, but now it is on 100.5 which has been on FM for the last two or three weeks, and it had a crummy signal due to the 100.5 translator. “Magic 590/100.5” plays the same music than “Fox Oldies” did, but they don’t play Janis Joplin or Bob Dylan that much, but they throw in some MOR standards to make the station sound more better, and plenty of 70’s light rock like Carly Simon, the Carpenters, Barry Manilow and others that “Fox Oldies” doesn’t play them. The only show I listened to “Magic” is Richie Norris doing his “Saturday Night at the Oldies” and it’s a great show to listen to him every Saturday night.

    And finally, there’s WLNG, same format, and it plays everything from the 50’s through the 80’s. The one show I like in afternoon drive is Brian “The Cannon” Bannon where he took over for Rusty Potz back at the end of May, and he does a great job.

    Those are the three competing oldies stations. In addition, there are internet radio stations to get your oldies fix is Rewound Radio, they had over 10,000 songs played on there, but “Fox Oldies” on the other hand has about 500 to 600 songs which is too small and too narrow. And then, there’s the Belmont’s Internet Radio, it plays doo-wop and some oldies from the 50’s and 60’s, and then WIXY 1260 Online based out of Cleveland, OH, and finally KYA Radio online based out of San Francisco.

    I’ve been said this a bunch of times on my previous posts and on two different boards about the problems with oldies and its competing stations.

    #143661

    radioperson
    Participant

    Also, don’t forget Scott Shannon’s True Oldies Channel: http://www.trueoldieschannel.com/

    And yes, the bottom line is demos. “Oldies” (the traditional variety playing late 50s to early 70s) has replaced “the Music Of Your Life” as a format that has just plain fallen off of the demo cliff. Reality check: “Brown Eyed Girl” by Van Morrison was released nearly fifty (50) years ago. Imagine a format in 1985 which featured primarily recordings made in the 1930s. To me, it is a remarkable that some of this music stayed on mainsteam radio as long as it did.

    #143674

    davideduardo
    Participant

    The first oldies station in New York City was WOR-FM when the station started playing Top 40 along with a mix of oldies that are 5-15 years old between 1954 through 1968. WOR-FM was the first FM Top 40 radio station under Bill Drake, and one of many Drake-Chenaut radio stations across the country like WRKO, CKLW, KFRC and KHJ.

    WOR-FM, from the period you mention between 1954 and 1966 duplicated WOR (AM) 100%.

    WOR-FM went on the air in 1941, so you have to specify when you think they were an oldies station.

    In or around 1966, WOR-FM did one of the first stereo rock formats with mostly currents… until eventually the Drake folks took over. And the Drake approach was not oldies, it was a modified Top 40.

    In any case, a station playing some gold in the mix was not an “oldies” station. An “oldies” station was one that played no currents. Period.

    There were quite a few FM Top 40 stations prior to WOR-FM. They were, simply, the FM simulcasts of big AM Top 40 stations. That included a fair number of daytime AMs that were on the air at night on FM only.

    #143680

    semoochie
    Participant

    The first oldies station in New York City was WOR-FM when the station started playing Top 40 along with a mix of oldies that are 5-15 years old between 1954 through 1968. WOR-FM was the first FM Top 40 radio station under Bill Drake, and one of many Drake-Chenaut radio stations across the country like WRKO, CKLW, KFRC and KHJ.

    WOR-FM, from the period you mention between 1954 and 1966 duplicated WOR (AM) 100%.

    WOR-FM went on the air in 1941, so you have to specify when you think they were an oldies station.

    In or around 1966, WOR-FM did one of the first stereo rock formats with mostly currents… until eventually the Drake folks took over. And the Drake approach was not oldies, it was a modified Top 40.

    In any case, a station playing some gold in the mix was not an “oldies” station. An “oldies” station was one that played no currents. Period.

    There were quite a few FM Top 40 stations prior to WOR-FM. They were, simply, the FM simulcasts of big AM Top 40 stations. That included a fair number of daytime AMs that were on the air at night on FM only.

    I’m almost sure that what he meant to say was when they were Oldies, they played 1954-68 but I can certainly see how you could misread it. By the way, for a short period during the 1980s after a recent rush of competitors, we had an Oldies station that played a limited amount of softer currents, described as “future gold”.

    #182340

    evantman
    Participant

    don’t forget 86 KONO “http://86kono.com

    out of San Antonio, Texas, they play 60’s and early 70s like they did on 101.1 during my childhood in the 90s and early 2000’s,

    ive even heard them slip in some 50s songs too, and i love that they brought back the original jingles they used in the 60s and 70s as well!

     

    #182341

    Tom McNally
    Participant

    KONO-FM (Classic Hits) is # 1 in the market with a 7.2,   while KONO (AM) is about # 28 with a .7 … what does that tell you ?

    #183075

    silkie
    Participant

    That’s probably one of the most popular questions with regard to any “oldies” station in the country. There are a few interesting facts about the format. Such as, when the first Oldies stations began to appear, they generally began as a weekend special – as an experiment. In 1972, WBZ Boston, which had been a Top 40 station during the 1960s, aired its first “Grease Weekend”, featuring the music and deejays of the 1950s. They actually flew in some of the top jocks in Top 40 radio for that weekend to augment the WBZ staff: Dick Biondi from WLS Chicago, Wolfman Jack from (I think) XERB, and some others whom I can’t remember off the top of my head. Getting off track. The first oldies STATIONS were playing music that was basically 5-15 years old. When the OLDIES brand burnt out about 10 years ago, the average age of the music was 25-40 years old. Its safe to say that the original Oldies stations back in the 1970s and early 80s were square in the middle of the money demo. Today, that demo is mainly retired on Social Security. Fixed income listeners don’t buy what they don’t need. And that’s the answer. Radio can’t sell that format because advertisers won’t spend money where they won’t get a return on their investment. WCBS-FM probably won’t make an actual format change any time soon. occasional format tweaks are to be expected, along with a blurring of the music lines, as later music shares a lot more ‘sameness’ than earlier tunes. But a format change? What would they flip to? Everything including Country, Hip Hop and Classic Rock are covered.

    That and advertising all of those drugs (that nobody buys or uses) on radio takes the pleasant stroll in the park television imagery distraction off the table, so that listeners actually hear the 6 seconds of commercial and 54 seconds of side effects and additional 30 seconds of disclaimers and freebie offers to get you in.

    No irony there.

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