Wall Street Journal To Shut Down Radio Operations

Wall Street Journal Radio Network This Morning Dow Jones Marketwatch Gordon DealDow Jones has told staffers that all operations of the Wall Street Journal Radio Network will end on December 31.

NTSMedia.com reports that Wall Street Journal Editor Gerry Baker came to the network’s South Brunswick, NJ headquarters to make the announcement to employees. Wall Street Journal Radio produces hourly Business News reports to radio stations such as WCBS New York, WLS Chicago, KGO San Francisco, and WLW Cincinnati.

NTS states that Baker told staffers that, “after taking a hard a look at business operations, despite great progress and growth, the radio network just doesn’t fit with the company’s future plans.”

Additional short-form programming produced by the network include Marketwatch Radio, The Wall Street Journal Report, Dow Jones Money Report, Watching Your Wallet, Barrons On Investment. Wall Street Journal also produces the long-form Wall Street Journal This Morning hosted by Gordon Deal. The program is fed hourly to affiliates from 5am to 9am eastern and currently airs on stations including 740 KTRH Houston, 680 WRKO Boston, 550 KFYI Phoenix, 600 KOGO San Diego, and 97.1 KFTK St. Louis.

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Lance Venta is the Owner and Publisher of RadioInsight.com and a consultant for RadioBB Networks specializing in integration of radio and the internet. Lance has two decades of experience tracking the audio industry and its use of digital platforms.

3 Comments


  1. Damn! I enjoy listening to the Wall Street Journal This Morning as I’m starting off my work day. I hope the stations that air this program find suitable programming to replace it.


    • Bloomberg Radio (which is handled by United Stations) is probably in the best position here–including for “The First Word” (which is analogous to “WSJ This Morning”).

      Beyond that, Westwood One still offers CNBC Business Radio–and I don’t think it’s affected by the closing of NBC News Radio. However, its programming may not be as extensive.


  2. It will be a shame if these programs disappear from the dial. The hosts do an excellent job and the other shows are not at the same quality level. Having the branding and trust of the Wall Street Journal is also an important factor. I wonder if someone will pick up any of the shows or at least one or more of the hosts? I have listened to Gordon Deal for quite a while. Market Watch is also a favorite. Who at WSJ thinks broadcast media is unimportant? I don’t even read the paper (who reads papers anymore) but I listen to the radio programs very often. Almost every day.

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